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-speaking pashtun who had been living in exile, a man named hamid karzai, to turn the pashtuns against the taliban. and, two, beat the taliban in kandahar in their home base. did i mention we're only talking about 11 guys here? they are operational detachment alpha 574. these 11 green berets, 11 men did something in 2001 that tens of thousands of americans are trying to redo nine years later in 2010. their story and their success is told through first-hand accounts by these green berets and with the assent of the families of those who did not survive in a remarkable new book called "the only thing worth dying for, how 11 green berets forged a new afghanistan." earlier i sat down with the author eric blehm, and army major jason amerine who led this team of 11 green berets on this incredible mission. thank you for being here. major, let me start with you. the taliban stronghold of kandahar, the only thing that most americans knew about afghanistan at the time that you were there. was that kandahar was their heartland. what was the plan to beat them there and what eventually worked? >> we worked with
with karzai. this is an opportunity for us to make sure that more draconian steps are taken and said if they steps that have yielded little results. >> i could not agree with you more. i cannot disagree with you at all. this is a moment and it will take a tough hand. >> i noticed the vote has not gone off. and to set fashion, which are drifting along here. -- in truth senate fashion, we are drifting along here. >> i'd prefer to look at this as an opportunity to finish my questions. i.t. why for being here and for your insights. -- thank you for your being here a year and says. my first question before i ask more about the long term, if each of you are satisfied that everything is currently being done that can be done with the short-term relief efforts, dr. former, you talk about how slow the relief efforts are and to a great extent that is because of the lack of infrastructure. is there more than should be done right now to address those relief efforts? >> thank you. i think there is a mismatch between the degree of interest and resources that we as a nation are putting in and the ab
karzai and his leadership to address this. >> what's your sense of that? have you seen any change in president's karzai steps? >> he's looking to ministers. he and i actually talked about this. his strategic intent is there. what struck me in meeting with these elders was the evolution of this corruption. so, it wasn't something that was always there. it's been over the last decade or so that they spoke to it. these same elders said to me that they were embarrassed that the united states soldier, sailors, airmen, marines were dying for them. they want to lead this effort. they appreciate what we've done, but they really want to lead this effort and this is something i know the president, president karzai is trying to engender in his leadership with his people. >> but what you talk about the leadership issue. you talked in the past about interviews about the critical need of good, local leadership. president karzai, by many accounts, is not moving forward in his second term. you know, his appointments to the cabinet were largely rejected by parliament and many on grounds that these
others have spoken to the need for president karzai and his leadership to address this. >> what's your sense of that? have you seen any change in president karzai's footsteps? >> initially -- he was -- looking to ministers and he and i actually talked about this in his strategic intent is there. what struck me in meeting with these elders was the evolution of this corruption. so it wasn't something that was always there. it has been over the last decade or so that they spoke to it. these same elders said to me that they were embarrassed, that the united states soldiers, sailors, airmen, marines were dieing and they want to lead this effort. they appreciate what we have done but they really want to lead this effort and this is something i know the president, president karzai, is trying to engender in his leadership with his people. >> you talk about the leadership issue and talked in the past and in interviews about the critical need of good local leadership. president karzai, by many accounts, is not moving forward in his second term. the -- his appointments to the cabinet were largely
to have the karzai government show us that we, that it is going to truly reform. >> well, let's start with the karzai government. senator mccain, while you were there, president karzai is trying another time to get his cabinet approved. if he cannot even get a cabinet approved and he does not have the faith of other people in their government that they're not corrupt. if we can't get to that simple first step, how can we build institutions and how can we repair roads and put people to work and educate them in afghanistan and build the confidence of the afghan people that trust your central government, not the taliban? >> well, they have a long way to go in the area of corruption, but the fact that the parliament rejected his nominees, i think you can look at a democratic process moving forward. i believe that president karzai recognizes that what he's just been through was an important lesson to him. we have to keep pressing on the corruption issue. but let me tell you two other things that concern me, first of all, i think we have the right strategy and the right resources and the ri
problem, and we have to have -- that's part of the equation, and we have to have the karzai government show us that we -- it is going to truly reform. >> let's start with the karzai government, senator mccain. while you are there, president karzai is trying another time to get his cabinet approved. if he cannot even get a cabinet approved, he does not have the faith of other people in his government that these people aren't corrupt, they know how to do the basics of good governance. if we can't get to that simple first step, how want we build institutions and build roads, put people to work and build confidence in the afghan people, trust your central government, not the taliban? >> they have a long way to go in the area of corruption. but the fact the parliament rejected his nominees, i think you could look at a democratic process moving forward. i believe president karzai recognizes that what he's just been through was an important lesson to him. we have to keep pressing on the corruption issue. let me tell you two other things that concern me. first of all, i think we have the right
government as well. guest: years ago when he met with hamid karzai at a dinner, someone said to him, mr. president, how are you going to address this problem of corruption? in fact, he said, what problem? joe biden, famously -- dinner was over -- he threw his napkin down and said, this dinner is over, and walked out. nothing has happened to defrost his relations with president karzai. both biden and richard holbrooke have terrible relations with karzai. host: james traub is with us to talk about the influence of joe biden. republicans, 202-737-0001. democrats, 202-737-0002. independents, 202-628-0205. you can send us an e-mail or tweet us at. next phone call. caller: i think our president is doing very well. if we wanted joe biden as president, he would be president. i like the idea that our president is intelligent. he is not a puppet, like the last eight years. i think he is doing what he is supposed to be doing. host: james traub? guest: i guess i would agree, in general. he believes he could be a good president. i believe this is almost a desirable alternative. he is a very knowledg
-nation conference on the future of afghanistan. afghan president hamid karzai said he expects foreign forces to be in his country for up to 15 years. there was also talk of a new plan to win over the taliban by allowing them into the afghanistan government. the executive of foreign editor of the london telegraph, also a terrorism expert. it is kind of like talking about both sides of your mouth. we say that this is one of the most brutal regimes on the planet and yet that they want to allow them into the afghanistan government. what do you make of that? >> reporter: well, this is a very ambitious program. the heart of the matter here is that there is a core of the taliban, the original founders who are never going to give in to the west and are always going to be an enemy. in recent years because of the we the afghan press has been handled the strength of the taliban has ground. there are a lot of people who would not normally support the taliban have been drawn in. the plan is to try and persuade them to come back into the mainstream of afghan politics by paying to lay down their guns. trac
't have to continue. khzaei -- karzai was a great hope. everyone no knows him respected him. he might change his mind. the pressures that led him to permit and maybe support this corrupt structure could be reversed over time. the people up and down that structure might change their mind. the parliament is -- has stood up against his nominations. who's knows who's going to happen up and down that road. if we succeed in something that we can do, peter has pointed out the crucial important to the kandahar road. than doesn't be impossible to secure that. that changes the economic nature of southern afghanistan. it could get better. >> if i could just add one point. there's no question that the ghost of vietnam haunts this administration. i can tell you from being in it for 60 days. the ghost of what happened to lyndon johnson walks the corridors of this white house, it walks the corridors of this building every day. it's a mistake. we got to get over it. we got to stop fighting the vietnam war. i don't know whether we could have won or not, but it is not relevant to afghanistan. as marc p
about the cabinet picks, the selections of hamid karzai. cabinet crisis reveals karzai's weakening grasp. lawmakers unhappy with the president's pick. what is the concern over the choices? >> guest: president karzai has made two sets of choices. he nominated once slate of cabinet officials about 24 of them. seventeen were rejected by the parliament. the parliament in a healthy move is asserting itself. this is a good thing. have some balancing, checks and balances as we understand them. so the parliament looked at the first slate of nominees from karzai and did not like many of them. rejected them. the parliament did choose, did agree, and did confirm several of the most important cabinet choices from president karzai, minister of defence and minister of interior which handles all the police, minister of finance, minister of agriculture. one of the big recipients of assistance. so the cabinet in this area somewhat. president karzai has recently submitted a second slate to replace those that were rejected the first time. these are lesser-known people. the second slate of lesser-known peop
and come over to the government's side. hamid karzai is willing to reconcile is taliban leaders with you the offer is not for anyone in al qaeda. leaders have been pushing for a program to entice militants. they must recognize afghanistan's constitution. >> the taliban are welcome to return to to their own country and work for peace in order for us to be able then to have the u.s. and other forces have the freedom to go back home. >> shannon: nato will conduct an investigation into a strike on a outpost. it was called for yesterday after soldiers fired on u.s. and afghanistan commandos. the afghan soldiers thought the unit was taliban militants and call it an unfortunate incidents. >> world leaders of the international conference on afghanistan agreed to a timetable obscurity duties but other issues remain unresolved. joining us, michael owe o'han lynn. >>> so this idea of reconciling with some of the taliban or inviting them to join the government in what it's trying to do, is it a good idea? >> it's early. we haven't established momentum on the battlefield. once we do, an offer can be
stated to be beginning about 18 months after to give karzai and his regime enough time to stand up and fight for itself. we will see. host: we have our numbers on the screen and we will get to the calls in immelman. -- in a moment. you laid out a number of issues which have to be practical issues that have to be dealt with, but the fact of the matter is that you bring vietnam and it becomes a political issue as well. tell us how you view this as a political issue. guest: the lesson that we need to learn, i think, from john kennedy's experience is this. he was with -- he was withdrawing at the time. we have the classified documents. but he did not tell the truth to the american people why? for political reasons. he wanted to get it reelected in 1964. he had begun to order the withdrawal in 1963. host: and these would have been the trainer said you talked about. guest: 16,000 of visors, not combat troops. but my point is that obama should not repeat that experience. he is clearly going to do the best that we can in a given amount of time, but what we face the prospect -- if we face t
analysts and commanders with the information they need. meantime, afghan president hamid karzai is expected to present a new list of cabinet nominees to parliament saturday. lawmakers last week rejected most of karzai's picks. and the family of the jordanian doctor who killed eight people on a c.i.a. base in afghanistan last week says he wanted to die in a holy war. abulawi had been recruited by jordanian intelligence to help the u.s. effort against al-qaeda. we have another account of stimulus money going to places that don't exist. and up next, what about the promises of transparency in healthcare reform talks? needs ts tomorrow morning. we should send them overnight with fedex. i already sent them. i didn't use fedex. better cross your fingers. [ man ] oh, yeah, the accident. well, you better knock on wood. remember, we did a green renovation in here, there's no wood. but russ bought a rabbit's foot. 's a bear claw. you could throw salt over your shoulder. actually, that's a salt substitute. but you should find dan -- i think he's a leprechaun. what is it about me that says leprechaun? c
karzai and with his cabinet on numerous occasions, notably with the trip that hillary clinton and i had made to afghanistan on october 18 and 19 in conjunction with the inauguration. the afghans understood this, they are very comfortable with it. so i need to underscore that's what july 2011 means. not a withdraw, but the start of a responsibility transition in which american combat troops will begin to draw down. on the second question and in regard to pakistan, i'm not sure quite how you phrase it. strobe, you made a generic comment? >> mike hamlin and his colleagues have put together a set of bench marks on sort of how things are going. and the trend that they feel they have identified in pakistan is ominous, negative by comparison with a year ago. >> yeah. i read mike's monthly, it's quarterly, actually, isn't it? i read mike's quarterly table with great interest. and it@@@@@@p it's a common problem i've seen in every war i've been involved in. let's not confuse the number of cell phones with low the war is going. let's not minimize that cell phone penetration is a hugely important
ability for governments. this was discussed at length to present karzai, and with his cabinet on numerous occasions, notably in putting the trip that hillary clinton and i made an afghanistan in october 18 and 19th in conjunction with president karzai's inauguration. the afghans understood this. they are very comfortable with it. . . to underscore that's what july 2011 means. not a withdraw, but the start of a responsibility transition in which american combat troops will begin to draw down. on the second question and in regard to pakistan, i'm not sure quite how you phrase it. strobe, you made a generic comment? >> mike hamlin and his colleagues have put together a set of bench marks on sort of how things are going. and the trend that they feel they have identified in pakistan is ominous, negative by comparison with a year ago. >> yeah. i read mike's monthly, it's quarterly, actually, isn't it? i read mike's quarterly table with great interest. and it helped -- influenced me a lot as we tried to develop our own benchmarks. but i think we have to be very careful about two things. maybe th
gear as losing its cachet and they point to the fact that president karzai began wearing this hat as an attempt to devise the war broke the was afghan rather than fm or regional but there is a quote in here from an afghani saying now it is clear mr. karzai is a passion. do you have confidence in the government, do you have concerns? >> guest: i have confidence and concerns just as i did in iraq. we have to understand the huge challenges the leaders in both of these countries face literally just in staying alive. i got to know hamid karzai when i first got to afghanistan at the beginning of 2002 when he had only been in office a few weeks himself. eight years later he's still in office facing extraordinarily challenges. and there are clearly a lot of problems and things he has to work on and things we have to do in support of him but i had the opportunity to get to know him personally and whatever hat he may be wearing at the moment one thing i absolutely persuaded is he is an afghan national list. >> host: next on call river hit new york on the republican line. >> caller: ambassad
hope you are speaking for yourself. >> you have done a great job with karzai. this is an opportunity for us to make sure that more draconian steps are taken and said if they steps that have yielded little results. >> i could not agree with you more. i cannot disagree with you at all. this is a moment and it will take a tough hand. >> i noticed the vote has not gone off. and to set fashion, which are drifting along here. -- in truth senate fashion, we are drifting along here. >> i'd prefer to look at this as an opportunity to finish my questions. i.t. why for being here and for your insights. -- thank you for your being here a year and says. my first question before i ask more about the long term, if each of you are satisfied that everything is currently being done that can be done with the short-term relief efforts, dr. former, you talk about how slow the relief efforts are and to a great extent that is because of the lack of infrastructure. is there more than should be done right now to address those relief efforts? >> thank you. i think there is a mismatch between the degree of int
with taliban fighters. president hamid karzai said he wants to let militants lay down their weapons and go home, so long as they are not affiliated with al qaeda. karzai spoke in istanbul, turkey, three days before an international conference on afghanistan in london. he said gathering international support was key. >> in the past, this effort by the afghan government did not have the backing or the support of our international partners. this current effort, this renewed effort, i should say, has the backing of our partners, in particular the united states and europe. >> sreenivasan: at the same time, the nato commander in afghanistan said he hopes an influx of troops will force taliban leaders to accept peace. general stanley mcchrystal suggested former taliban could even join the government. he said, "i think any afghans can play a role if they focus on the future, and not the past." also today, nato officials announced two more soldiers-- one british, one norwegian-- have been killed in bombings in afghanistan. the u.s. military will speed up a review of more than 4,300 iraq and afghanistan
on afghanistan reveals how difficult it will be for president hamid karzai to make good on his promise to crack down on rampant corruption in that country. the u.n. office on drugs and crime says $2.5 billion in bribes were paid to public officials over the past 12 months. those bribes added up to almost a quarter of afghanistan's gross domestic product. one person in two in afghanistan had to pay at least one kickback in the last year. >>> corruption, you may recall, is also a big issue in china. today a former judge on china's highest court was sentenced to life in prison for accepting almost $600,000 in bribes. but he's hardly alone. china's official anti-corruption commission said that 106,000 officials were found guilty of corruption last year. last week, the office of the top prosecutor said 4,000 chinese officials had fled the country with a total of $50 billion in stolen cash over the last three decades. which takes to us this question. as chinese technology helps power that country toward surpassing japan as the world's second largest economy after the u.s., is china stealing to get th
that is also used to make bombs. president karzai's office banned the use of use production storage purchase or sale of ammonium nitrate. nato-led forces have already been confiscating it and urging local farmers to use a different type of fertilizer. intelligence officials say pakistani security forces killed three militants in north waziristan today. the troop's first reported foray in the region in months. the u.s. is pressing pakistan to be more aggressive there against al-qaeda and the taliban. police in turkey today rounded up 120 people with suspected lengths to al-qaeda. in simultaneous predawn raids in 16 provinces. among those detained a university faculty member suspected of recruiting students and sending them to afghanistan for training. aid officials say haitians are fleeing earthquake-ravaged port-au-prince by the hundreds of thousands. meanwhile, thursday was said to to be the first day since the quake that there were no successful rescues. correspondent brian wilson is live tonight in port-au-prince with an update on the effort to find some missing americans at the hotel mon
actually bring peace? afghan president hamid karzai says that the u.s. and europe are warming up to the idea of talking with taliban fighters. the goal? convincing them to stop fighting and to rejoin afghan society. for more on this, let's bring in atia abawi, this has critics and p proponents. what's the latest? >> reporter: absolutely. this isn't anything new when it comes to the afghan government. president karzai himself has been pushing for it for the last several years. he has a reconciliation department where they've been reaching out to various members of the taliban and different insurgency groups throughout the country. i actually spoke to two former taliban fighters and government officials during the taliban regime, and they say the reason that they're coming to the side of the afghan government is because they want the fighting to stop. they want peace in afghanistan. but we also have to look back altogether last monday, the attacks that we saw here in the capital city, it was just going on for hours on end. gunfire, explosions, that was caused by the taliban. and th
levin just returned from afghanistan. >> another thing to watch is whether or not president karzai and we can come up with a program for reintegration of those lower level taliban which will chip away at the power at the taliban and help support the efforts of the afghan security forces. >> reporter: u.s. commanders acknowledge the need to bring at least some lower level taliban leaders into the political and social fabric of afghanistan. general stanley mcchrystal, the top military commander, when asked if the taliban could play a role in the future of afghanistan said, i think any afghans can play a role if they focus on the future and not the past. but reality remains harsh. u.s. troops continue their push into helmand province in the south. the next target? the marjah area, yet another taliban strong hold. and in north waziristan, bad new pz p the pakistani military has told the u.s. it's delayed further combat operations here. that will give unsurge ents more time to consolidate and possibly launch new attacks into afghanistan. u.s. military intelligence calculates the taliban
. that's the same message we saw and heard in afghanistan with hamid karzai. these reluctant leaders that we, the united states, need. >> that's exactly right, tamron. we'll find the focus shifting from afghanistan to other potential sanctuaries, and in all of these cases we're dealing with teetering or failed states, weak governments, imperfect allies. but we have to work with them and find a way to partner with these imperfect friends and find a way to root out al qaeda within their countries, be much more aggressive with intelligence operations, because we're not going to be able to apply military forces to these places. >> i want to take that point directly to jim at the pentagon. jim, on that point as far as yemen, how much does our military, does our government, how much can we trust the yemeni government? >> there's not a whole lot of trust of the the ability of the yemen government, you know, they do feel at this point that the yemen government is sincere in trying to take down, or at least diminish the effectiveness of al qaeda in yemen itself. it's also dealing with a civil
by afghan president hamid karzai is viewed as one of the most corrupt in the world and building the capacity for a functioning government and build up police and military so they can over the course of the next 18 to 24 months take control, take responsibility for the security situation here. julie. >> julie: connor powell, thank you. closer to home now, mexico announcing the capture of an alleged drug lord from a notoriously violent gang south of the bore they are. carlos dell tran l. vechlt a, carrying two guns and ammo and a false driver's license. he was nabbed on wednesday and waiting to disclose his arrest. his older and powerful brother was killed in a shootout with mexican troops. arturo beltran was the reputed treat of the beltran leva cartel. his taking down one of the highest in the mexican government's fight against drug gangs. a plane slides off a runway in germany, and collides in turkey, as we go around the world in 80 seconds. turkey, a passenger train crashing head-on into another train. the collision in northwestern turkey killing one of the engine drivers and injuring at
. those cables show ambassador karl eikenberry was even more worried than previously thought about karzai's leadership. he wrote, "sending additional forces will delay the day when afghans take over and make it difficult if not impossible to bring our people home on a reasonable timetable." >> and white house chief of staff rahm emanuel is under fire on the front page of t"the wall street journal". the paper writes that the president's liberal backers are blaming the chief of staff from a long list of grievances from gitmo to health care. they're directing their anger less at president obama than at rahm emanuel. he says he's the obstacle to the changes they thought mr. obama's election would make. and look at this full page ad moveon is running in "usa today." if people read newspapers in their hard copy form, this might be effective. i don't know if the white house even gets hard copies of newspapers anymore. still, it shows you where this is going. >> they had some problems. we'll move on -- we should mention before we finish here that first read, you've got to check it out. we update
working together so well recently. >> rose: do you have great confidence in the karzai government that they will be a partner this snefrt i think we cannot look only toll the national government of afghanistan. this is a young government. they've got deep systemic flaws they are burdened with corruption but it is a struggling democracy. but we need to lo beyond that at a village level. this is all about politics and as the late tip o'neill said, all politics is local. it's certainly case in counterterrorism, counterinsurgency. and i thin that's the way we must approach it. it's not just capital to capital nation to nation. this is a fight about the people and for the people. >> rose: turn your attention to al qaeda and how they see the world. and where do they get their momentum and where do they get their strength and where do they get their opportunity. >> there are many theories and my guess-- and that's all it is sds that it may well be about globalization and the growth of free market societies, the growth of liberal institutions around the world. and if you look at in in tho
karzai. >> do you feel this year is the last chance? >> i cannot describe it as the last chance or the only chance, no. i can say that this is an important opportunity with the renewal of interest in afghanistan by the united states and the rest of the world with more awareness within afghanistan on our shofalls and shortcomings and the requirements for afghanistan. >> part of the opposition of the united states was americans are losing their lives, and we know afghan security forces and civilians are losing their lives, too. but americans are losing their lives when corruption is undermining the objective. >> corruption is undermining our government, our society, and we must continue to work against it. i, as the president of afghanistan, am responsible and must take care of the afghan part of corruption within the afghan government. >> when you went to helmand, you were told it was rocket-fueled gunfire that was fired at you. how many assassition attempts? >> i don't know. maybe three, four. that's not much. >> when the u.s. keeps pushing you to go out more in the country -- >
was -- >> the karzai government -- >> i think again this is one that is also better directed to the state department i think it is probably a sign of some progress house odd as that may sound that there is a healthy give-and-take between the branches of government and in a space afghanistan where the parliament, the legislature is saying we are not going to necessarily rubber-stamp the president's cabinet choices. we have checks and balances here, the congress has to confirm every cabinet selection here and a similar thing is going on there. with that said we have a process as quickly as possible because the government in afghanistan is something that needs to improve quickly and the longer there is limbo the more difficult that becomes. yes, go ahead. >> [inaudible] -- about to happen in yemen and the u.s. but already some of the top leaders pushed back of the exact level of taking from the u.s. and and and -- does that told the u.s. caused with operations to help identify [inaudible] >> i haven't seen the comments which you refer. i've seen other comments from the many military or civilian leaders t
make progress in reducing the ramp at opm and narcotics trade in this area. president karzai has pledged to eradicate poppy crops, but there must be development of crops and methods other than poppy's to sustain the people in this country. in southern afghanistan, the u.s. department of state and agriculture is working one to regain its potential. understanding the reality is on the ground in afghanistan and is essential. we urge the president to follow his advice of making strategic decisions. secretary gates has worked to reaffirm our short and long term goals to our troops and continues the sacrifice. this is very important and we thank him. we now know that the u.s. military faces a threat involving forces. instead, terrorist networks employ unconventional uses of force to remain invisible until their attack. to preempt this threat, we rely heavily on our intelligence gathering systems and professionals at home and abroad. this reminded us of the terrorists. the arrest of a terrorist makes clear that there is much to be reviewed in the way intelligence is shared, collected an
closed. and also is karzai with his cabinet list and with a stand-off with a new list cabinet and others were rejected in the past week. but the parliament showed no sign of bowing to karzai's wishes. and the house speaker promising a thorough vetting of the candidates. we have gwen joining us. caller: good morning, steve, how are you. host: i am great. caller: happy new year. i am calling as an african-american woman, i want to make a comment. i think that senator reid's comment is onpoint. some people donxunderstand what he is saying. i understand where he is coming from. and that's why the african-american community jumps on his side. because we understand why he is where he's coming from. i do not want o-any republican any other person in america to make this racial, because it's not. what he is saying is so true. and the other point is on the book that anne kornblut wrote, in alabama, we have one female and several gentlemen running for mayor, we have an election on 19th of february. the female came in because of [inaudible], but did you know that she lost the two gentlemen. and
for hamid karzai says the leader is surprised by the rejection of most of his cabinet choices. he will submit new choices for the cabinet but is not clear when that will happen. the rejection will delay efforts to establish a functioning government. >>> president obama ordered 30,000 additional troops into afghanistan this year. will that provide the stability the country needs or trigger an increase in violence? conor powell in kabul with the latest from afghanistan. good to see you, corner. >>> well, shannon, talking to analysts first on the military and on the civilian side there seems to be a broad consensus that the violence will continue to get worse in 2010. that there will be more bloodshed and simply more deaths but 2009 was a record year and there is this fear that this will be a much worse year. general mcchris tollway said before things get better here on the found in afghanistan things will get worse but phrased that as part of the process of improving and stablizing afghanistan. there are more american and international troops and more afghan troops on the way and be
and eventual victory by hamid karzai. they discuss the presidential elections for this may. it was held at the u.s. institute of peace in washington, d.c. >> good morning, everyone. we can proceed. thank everyone for coming. my name is john dempsey with the u.s. institute of peace, based in afghanistan. i have the privilege of actually being here in washington this week for this, our first public event on afghanistan of 2010. i'm so happy we have such a good turnout, i recognize some faces here, see a lot of people i haven't seen around before and i look forward to a frank discussion with our distinguished panelist today on a subject that clearly has been getting a lot of attention over the last year, given what we saw in the difficult election season in afghanistan last year but that also has not yet gone away. i think once we got through the difficult process of the elections last year, people were breathing a collective sigh of relief that we moved on and could actually get on with governance and moving toward with strategic objectives in the country, but yet, we have another electio
for reforming washington. >> is there a way that can be accomplished? >> president karzai is heading to london this week and he wants some taliban taken off the u.s. sanctions welist in exchange for their laying down their arms. >> you have heard that general petraeus discussed similar type efforts in afghanistan, political reconciliations. you have per general mcchrystal discussed the same thing. obviously, that is a similar path to what happened in iraq. each of those two individuals have talked through this. this is provided that whoever this is accept the event constitution, renounces violence, and publicly breaks through the groups that advocate violence. that is what people expect under the notion of reconciliation. >> last week, the win put out a report saying that the amount of graft and kickbacks in of denniston is about $2.3 billion per year which is 25% of their gross domestic product. who in the administration is really writing point on dealing with issues of corruption in afghanistan? >> a group of people working and our afghan policy -- let me figure out where some of that inform
is extending an olive branch to the taliban and hamid karzai asking them to lay down their weapons and to crack down on the insurgency. >>> despite the weak housing market and perhaps because of it it's back in a big way. high stakes investment strategy, it's not for everyone. there is a lot of folks who need to know something about it before diving in. casey is live in mesa, arizona. >> good to see you. this new trend we're talking about is sweeping the southwest with nevada, arizona and california having the highest foreclosure rates in the country. here is where things are different than a few years ago, when average joes were flipping houses at the height of the housing bubble. then almost anyone could buy a home from a loan from a bank. in order to buy a foreclosure, you got to pay in full. obviously, that is not for everyone, even though you get crazy deals, you have to sometimes shell out hundreds of thousands of dollars in cold, hard cash. >> you can't just jump in and make money. i've been here 30 years, you have to know the region you are buying in and know you can sell it really quic
blocked karzai's plan to governor for kabul. she interweaves a very well- written and interestingly a history that is a well-written, well-organized and based on her own research with original sources. a second really important understanding of the country can be gotten from the book "the opium season," which details a year in which he was involved as a -- a subcontractor in u.s.a.i.d. efforts in 2004-2005 to provide alternative livelihood's to draw with a workforce from opium production. it gives a view of the violence, tribal and warlord relations, and moreover, it shows the bureaucratic profiteering and dysfunction that is increasing the complexity and cost of our involvement, not just in war, but in development. a third source, and i think it is outstanding if you want to understand the country is stored, who within weeks after the fall of the taliban locked to kabul in the winter, which is supposed to kill you -- what to kabul in the winter, which is supposed to value and described the bill which experience in a week -- and described that experience in a way in which any develo
counts of first degree murder. afghanistan's parliament is rejecting 17 of president hamid karzai's 24 cabinet nominees and says that he has to make new selections. the head of the u.n. mission in afghanistan is calling the ruling a setback that will delay efforts to get a functioning government up and running. officials say karzai will now have to spend political energy nominating new choices when the country should be focused on needed reform. >> didn't take them because they're corrupt. >> really. >> this is' heavy snow falling in salem, massachusetts and some strong winds, let's get a check on all of this from rick reichmuth in the weather center. >> the northeast has been pummelled with more wind and snow and that area of low pressure, the downer clock-wise circulation has gotten so wound up. warm air across the north side of that. bangor maine, 36 degrees. burlington vermont, 10 degrees. cold air across the eastern two-thirds of the country. if you want warm temps go far out towards the west and the satellite radar picture for us is going to be continuing to show a little bit of
process when you take a look at the election in afghanistan, hamid karzai, which to a lot of people look like a joke and ahmadinejad's election as well, that there's going to be some real changes that people are going to be looking for. >> again, i go back to my biggest winner, hillary clinton, here, because, you know, if the world changes in iran, in a way we might like, this is also something she can use, particularly as a woman, because women have been so vocal against ahmadinejad in iran, i think this is the way that hillary clinton can flex her muscle. >> all right. happy new year to all of you. thank you very much. hope we'll all be winners this year. >> yes. >> all right. thanks again. >> thanks. >>> our cnn's jeanne moos has made us think and laugh with a year full of the most unusual reports. well, we've chosen our favorite. wait until you see what it is. host: could switching to geico really save you 15% or more on car insurance? host: did the waltons take way too long to say goodnight? mom: g'night john boy. g'night mary ellen. mary ellen: g'night mama. g'night erin. elizabeth
. look at afghanistan with karzai, sure we support the united states, you are not going against supporting the united states. but back room deal. >> yemen is trying to get rid . >> president obama sanctioned the air strike specifically against alaki who is the iman who is tied to the fort hood shooter and abdullmuttallab . he managed to survive the air strike before christmas. >> and the president wrapped up counter terrorism against yemen and spent 67 million last year alone. five million in 2006 . it is ramped up the president is serious about that and airport security. we are finding out that the pat downs, one of the second screening efforts are effectism. you have an underwear bomber, how in the world is a pat down going to catch something. >> how is it that they are doing it? >> it wouldn't matter in i demonstrate you. >> do i have to do this? >> you cannot board the plane. >> this is all they do. they do the side touching and quick side touch that's it. >> that's it. >> and if the underwear bomber had stuff hidden where -- >> you're dangerous. the point is they are so pol
is the evidentry bar for that. is that smart to target drug dealers because karzai's brother is purporpted to be on the drug trade. is he on the target list? if not, what distinguishes him from one of the dealers who is? so a lot of interesting questions are posed and i think it's right to wonder why a program of assassination conducted in their name, people who don't feel like they have the right to find out about that. host: where did you get your information from? guest: various places. a lot from reporting done by other media. everything has been written about this as well as talking to intelligence, present and former senior intelligence officers. the ranking member of the intelligence committee, he got on our national security blog and commented on this. we put the question up, what do you know about this program? so various sources. think tank people, counter terrorism experts, both here and overseas. host: what was the reaction when you asked the question about the program and trying to learn more about it? guest: i think a lot of people thought it's a good idea to -- i'll tell you
these countries face huge challenges. literally just in staying alive. i got to know karzai what a first arrived in afghanistan in 2002 when he had only been in office for a few weeks. eight years later he is still in office facing extraordinarily y challenges. there clearly are a lot of problems. i got to know him personally. but never had he might be wearing at the moment, one thing i am persuaded of is that he is an afghan nationalists. host: next phone call riverhead, new york. caller: ambassador, good morning. i had the recent experience that the third person i talked to came from iraq mentioned it to me that the came from mesopotamia and blamed england for forming a country. they did not bear animosity towards us for coming over there, but felt the only way their country could survived between the different factions was to have a dictatorship. i was wondering if you had experience with any of those ideas? guest: there are as many ideas in iraq about the direction of governance as you might find it in this country. borders throughout the region are artificial in many cases. those borders
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